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2585 Willamette St
Eugene, OR, 97405
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541-345-8986

The official online home of Tsunami Books in Eugene, Oregon.

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Words

Here you'll find coverage of our events in local publications, Staff Picks book reviews, Tsunami stories, and other miscellaneous words.

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, PART 9:

Scott Landfield

The Future of Tsunami Books, Part 9
(please feel free to share, now in tweet-able size!):

Today, Tsunami was fortunate to receive a $4000 pledge. The process continues! It is heartening to have support at many different levels.

The Future of Tsunami Books, Part 8:

Scott Landfield

The Future of Tsunami Books, Part 8
(please feel free to share):

Yesterday, February 8, was Show-of-Support for Tsunami Day, which marks the first of a 50-day process to try to secure another 5+ year lease at 2585 Willamette. Upwards of 500 good people came through. The first day pledge total was something over $33,000. As bookstore campaigns go, that is the best result I have ever heard for a first day (someone needs to get in touch with The New York Times:-). Please drop by the store and pick up a Survey and Pledge form, and maybe a few for your friends? Or copy one or a few off our Tsunamibooks.org website at http://www.tsunamibooks.org/words/

The process has been great so far. The organizing, volunteering, meeting, heartful giving. This is something we all need a little practice with for these trying days ahead. 

Thank you very much for your efforts! No predicting what will happen; it's all about the process for now.

2/9/17

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, PART 7:

Scott Landfield

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, PART 7
(please feel free to share this):

Wednesday, February 8, 10 AM-9 PM:  
Show-of-Support for Tsunami Day.

The Lease for Tsunami Books is up June 30, 2017. There are other major business concerns that want to take over this property beginning July 1, 2017. We want to keep our Community Bookstore and Cultural Center growing here at 2585 Willamette Street in beautiful South Eugene, but do not yet have the financial resources to stay. We have asked for, and kindly received the opportunity to deliver a proposal to the building owners for a minimum five-year lease. The deadline is March 31. At the very least, the rent will double. 

On December 28, 2016, a Public Meeting was held. Thirty-nine people participated. Since then a growing number of motivated members of the Community have stepped up to help, and after five meetings a highly creative plan is being formulated. To that end, WE INTEND TO RAISE +/- $400,000 BY MARCH 30TH TO SECURE A NEW FIVE YEAR LEASE WITH OPTIONS. 

The key question: Is there enough support from the Community that is Tsunami Books to energize this movement? To help us find out, please drop by the Bookstore, even for a moment, on Wednesday, February 8, from 10 AM-9 PM. That’s the day we’ve picked as Show-of-Support for Tsunami Day. We’ll be taking a head count, and we’ve got a very simple 4-question form we’d like you to fill out, with copies to share with your friends. Volunteers from the ad-hoc committee and Scott (prez and gm) will be here all day to answer your questions and listen to your ideas. The newspapers, tv, and radio are all being notified. Let’s share a laugh and a tear of joy, and get on with the effort to make our own good way in this crazy new world.

Thank you.

2/3/17

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, Part 6:

Scott Landfield

The Future of Tsunami Books, Part 6
(please feel free to share this):

An initial "Public Meeting" about the Future of Tsunami was held on Wednesday, December 28 here at the Bookstore. Approx. 35 people, ages 4 to 70+, participated in statement of facts, q & a, and discussion. 
Basically, the Tsunami Books Lease is up come June 30, 2017. It is possible to acquire a new lease, minimum 5 years, at a considerable increase in rent. How to guarantee the rent is the question. The answer will likely need to appear in January if Tsunami is to continue at its present location.

The meeting lasted just under 2 hours. No one left. Many folks considered it a very good first meeting. A general email group named "The Future of Tsunami" was formed (all emails kept private here at the bookstore, group messaging through bcc), as well as two specific smaller groups: "The Future One" includes folks who have both interest and the financial capability to help plan and secure Tsunami's future at 2585 Willamette; "The Future Two" includes folks who are interested in a more general brainstorming toward a long-term, permanent home for Tsunami, and possibly other compatible for-profit and non-profit businesses. 

Please email me (Scott) at tsunami1@opusnet.com if you would like to take part in the general email (update) group, or either of the active sub-groups. I'll send you a facts sheet, an email form, and a statement entitled "Securing the Future of Tsunami." These you are welcome to share around.

It should be noted that a meeting for "The Future One" is scheduled to occur next week. Please email me if you might care to attend.

thanks again,
Scott Landfield

1/4/17

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 5:

Scott Landfield

Wednesday, December 28, 7 PM:  Public Meeting regarding The Future of Tsunami Books. The Lease for Tsunami Books is up June 30, 2017. Will it continue at its present location, will it be moved, or will it dissolve? The facts will be presented, followed by a question and answer, and discussion period. An as-yet unscheduled second meeting-by-invite will be held to deal with specific finacial issues. Please email Scott at tsunami1@opusnet.com with questions/comments.

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 4:

Scott Landfield

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 4:
(please feel free to share)

Our 21st Anniversary Sale is now behind us.
Thank you very much, Folks, for the best Anniversary ever!

And some more good news, at least potentially:
A phone conversation on Tuesday, November 29, 2016
now leads me to think that another 21 years at a (remodeled) 
2585 Willamette is possible. Not easy, but possible.  
What will it take?:

For One: It's going to take a gathering of what are called "Angels;"
likely both individual Angels, and a community of Angels. If you are a potential "Angel," or know one, please feel free to email me, Scott, here at tsunami1@opusnet.com. A meeting will soon occur, and it would be good if you would consider coming.

Number Two: Tsunami Books Inc needs a second full-time working owner. One (me, Scott Landfield), age 63, with no money, is not enough to keep this place growing as a Bookstore and Commuinity Center. Tsunami was conceived and built as a place for at least two worker/owners. Know someone who might like the idea of being a working owner of a Bookstore/Performance Center/Publishing House? Email is a good way to start.

Number Three: The time to get things moving is Now. Time is limited. People (angels) will need to come together, a plan developed, and a substantial business decision made.

Number 4: This fiscal year that (technically) began July 1, 2016 must be our best, both from a business, and from an events point of view. So far so good. Let's all have an especially good holiday season.

Folks, Tsunami Books is still in the running for another 20 years at this location. To be honest, I am shocked, pleasantly so, by this latest information. Certainly many people come by, both curious and hopeful. Personally, I'm not into hope, I'm into action. For now, I'll keep the information flow up-to-date using this Facebook Page, as well as our email list. And we'll have hard-copy information at the counter, so drop on by.  
Let's do something about the future.
thanks, sl

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 3

Scott Landfield

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 3:
(please feel free to share)

Our Gift Certificate (Giftcard) Campaign ends August 3, so the time to pick one up is Now.

Crowd Funding through the purchase of Gift Certificates (Giftcards) goes well. Many folks are coming in and buying them across the counter, and Tsunami's Indiegogo site has already garnered almost 1300 views.

Most important is the outpouring of good feelings, well-wishes, and ideas. In particular, there are already exciting ideas beginning to percolate outside the store that are seeping in. It is clear that this year beginning July, 2016 needs to be the best yet for Tsunami Books, both as a very small business and, more important, as a center for all the communities who use this Bookstore as a backdrop for their activities and events.

Thanks!

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/your-giftcard-purchases-help-tsunami-books-thrive#/

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 2

Scott Landfield

THE FUTURE OF TSUNAMI BOOKS, part 2:
(please feel free to share)

Now is a great time to purchase Tsunami Books Gift Certificates!
We want to sell 200 Giftcards (Gift Certificates) in 30 days.

Drop on by the store, or just click on our convenient, 
Tsunami Books Indiegogo Crowd Funding Campaign.
Use them anytime, on ANYTHING in the store,
including ticketed music, theater, and poetry performance events.

The Perfect Gift for the Lover of All Things Tsunami:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/your-giftcard-purchases-help-tsunami-books-thrive#/

Help Tsunami Thrive on Willamette Street!

Scott Landfield

Check out our Indiegogo campaign and pick up a gift certificate or some! It's the perfect way to get prepared for the holiday season long before the busy-ness sets in, or show a special someone how much you appreciate them, or even to treat yourself—you've been working hard, after all, and you deserve it! Plus, you can help us get our shelves stocked for a great year coming. Thanks so much.

The Future of
Tsunami Books, Part One
(Please Feel Free To Share)

Scott Landfield

Folks, this begins an ongoing update and discussion regarding the above theme. It will be Included in all monthly emails, and will be updated regularly on our Facebook Page  and website, at http://www.tsunamibooks.org/words. These writings will all be initiated by me, Scott Landfield, 20 years a working owner, and de facto Mayor of Tsunami Books. It should be understood that, without new and exciting, if presently unknown help from outside the Bookstore, keeping Tsunami Books alive and thriving beyond July 1, 2017 is impossible.

Tsunami Books has been at 2585 Willamette Street in beautiful South Eugene for 21 years. Last year at this time we signed a two-year lease extension after completing a Crowd-funding Campaign ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K5tdX1cOPE ) that allowed us to cover a part of the increased costs of keeping this working-class bookstore alive and healthy, if still poor. Sometime soon after July 1, 2017 there are plans to level this building, tentatively replacing it with a two-story retail building, with rent at approximately double the present rate.

This news saddens a lot of good people. Tsunami has often been called “an Institution”; certainly the 3500+ events we’ve hosted, all surrounded by books shelved on precious recycled lumber, have created an exquisite patina like, well, simply like nothing else. “A big umbrella for the arts, and the human heart,” to paraphrase what store-partner Dave Rhodes once said when he was active in the biz. Frankly, as a mature, healthy 62 year old man, it is frustrating that now, when I am finally beginning to make enough of a living to dig myself out of the hole I leaped into when I bought into this then-one-year-old business, it is also very possibly time to call it quits. Certainly, if I look at this alone, that is the only option. That’s why the time has come to somehow open the discussion to the community. I have no idea what that means, but if successful will likely include meetings, significant start-up fundraising, possibly finding a new home, possibly new ownership, and most certainly an expanded vision of this “Institution,”

One thing is absolutely certain: Even though Tsunami Books began with no money, and still has no money (literally, not figuratively, no money), these times a’comin’-- the retail sales, the events, the hearts touching hearts--between now and July 1, 2017 need to be the best ever here at the Bookstore. If they are, opportunities for a future life may somehow materialize. And if a next incarnation of Tsunami Books does not materialize, then it’s all the more important that, beginning today, this Bookstore needs to thrive in all ways. Not to go out in a blaze of glory, but to continue the blaze of glory, and see where it leads.

Thanks!

This Is the Part
Where You Laugh
by Peter Brown Hoffmeister

Scott Landfield

Peter Brown Hoffmeister’s first young adult novel, This Is the Part Where You Laugh, opens with the young protagonist Travis releasing two small South American crocodiles he bought from a guy who posted a flier at the Chevron station—caimans—into the little lake in the middle of the North Eugene neighborhood where Travis lives. The book is compulsively readable from the first page.

When he’s not writing, Hoffmeister teaches English and outdoor skills at South Eugene High School in the Integrated Outdoor Program, and is well-loved by his students. As a teen, he ran away from home and got expelled from two boarding schools. He was placed in a minimum-security “life challenge program” in East Texas after facing legal troubles, and ran away from that too. He finally ended up at South Eugene as a student and met an English teacher who mentored him. Now, as a teacher, he mentors troubled students. The circle continues.

This Is the Part Where You Laugh focuses on teens struggling to be as good as they can in bad circumstances. The novel deals with addiction, homelessness, racism, violence, abuse—and the hope and humor that keep its characters trying in spite of all that.

Hoffmeister blends the immediacy of first person present tense narration seamlessly with memory in short, poignant chapters. Masterful withholding of key information until just the right moment heightens the suspense that keeps you reading. As I read, I loved not knowing how all the separate parts of the story would tie together, but having faith that they would—and being right. Travis’s authentic voice carries the novel, and it teems with sentences that stop you. One of my favorites: “The morning is like a new box of nails, dew silver on the grass.”

Place names invoke a kind of magic in writing—a magic of specificity. For me this magic comes through even when I know nothing about the places being named. When Travis rides his bike on streets I’ve been on—Gilham, Green Acres, 7th—and along Eugene’s river bike path, I thrill. A place I drive by every week—the park under the Washington-Jefferson Bridge—is the setting for one of the novel’s most crucial scenes, and it makes me drive by a little slower, look closer.

The novel is full of characters with complexities that make them heartbreakingly realistic: Travis’s homeless junkie mom, his grandparents in their mobile home, Natalie the girl across the lake, and his best friend Creature. And Travis, who tries over and over again to be good and do good, who keeps screwing it up, but keeps on trying anyway. It’s hard to watch, hard to read, but it’s a huge part of what makes this book so good. More than anything, it’s a book about compassion—about hearing perspectives it would be easier to ignore. Travis says, “Sometimes I get mad or jealous when I think about other people’s parents, but mostly I get confused. Why are some people the way they are, while other people are like my mom? It’s easy to say it’s the drugs, but what was it before that? Maybe we need to ask more questions.” That’s what it’s about: asking those questions.

Tsunami Books will host a book release celebration for This Is the Part Where You Laugh on Tuesday, May 17th at 7pm. The book is also for sale on our shop with free shipping anywhere in the USA!

Review by Meli Ewing

Eat Pray Love
Made Me Do It!

Scott Landfield

Just arrived at Tsunami: copies of "Eat Pray Love Made Me Do It"! This anthology of essays, introduced by Elizabeth Gilbert herself, brings together in one place nearly fifty diverse and fascinating stories of inspirational personal change.

One of the featured writers is Eugene's own Crystal Gasser, who tells the story of what "Eat Pray Love" meant to her as she came of age eager to travel, hungry for a divine connection. Pick up a copy today, and be sure to check out this video of Crystal reading her essay, "Divine Timing."

The Orchardist
by Amanda Coplin

Scott Landfield

As we celebrate spring—waking from our winter slumber with our senses eager for the smell of fresh cut grass, the warmth of the sun on our back, the blossoms in sweet pastels of pink, purple, and white—pick up a copy of Amanda Coplin’s The Orchardist.

Follow gentle Talmadge as he cares for his apples and apricots in the exquisite Wenatchee Valley of Washington. Talmadge’s simple and peaceful orchard brings two troubled young women to his land. Together, the three complex characters struggle for safety in the rural frontier landscape of the Northwest as they attempt to deal with pasts of fear, abuse, and loss. This book is an ode to the richness of the quiet connections between quiet people.

 

We have copies on sale right now for $10 each here at Tsunami. A few of them are signed!

Writing books!

Scott Landfield

Our used writing section is fantastic these days! Reading about writing brings valuable insight to the work you're working on, and it can be a great way to get unstuck if you find yourself stuck. I can personally recommend Anne Lamott's Bird By Bird as the best and most thoroughly enjoyable writing guide I have ever read. Jacques Barzun's Simple & Direct is a sure winner, too.

Bookstore Owner Running for Mayor of Eugene

Scott Landfield

Scott Landfield

The anti-establishment candidate

ARTICLE | MARCH 17, 2016 - 12:00AM | BY ALEX V. CIPOLLE

Scott Landfield speaks out to save Kesey Square at a Jan. 25 City Council public forum

If Scott Landfield, owner of Tsunami Books, is elected mayor of Eugene come November, what will be the top item on his agenda?

“The first thing I’ll do is demand a recount,” Landfield tells EW. He’s only half-joking. 

In an election year when it’s become trendy, nationwide, for candidates to puff out their chests and claim to be the anti-establishment choice, this designation seems to actually ring true for Landfield.

For starters, Landfield says he’s not looking for endorsements or sniffing out campaign contributions.

“Let’s see what no money, no endorsements, no campaign coordinator, no campaign staff— let’s see what it can do in this town,” the self-described Independent says. “Hopefully it will inspire a lot of people.” 

Landfield has lived a life outside the mainstream: He grew up in southern Illinois where his parents, who he describes as communists-turned-Democrats, ran a newspaper. In 1978, he moved to Eugene. Upon arrival, Landfield planted trees for 20 years, eight of which he spent as a Hoedad — aka a member of the Hoedads Reforestation Cooperative (he was even chairman of the board once). He’s also a prominent member of the spoken-word scene in Eugene.

In 1995, he launched Tsunami Books, a neighborhood shareholder corporation, of which he is president and general manager. The expenses of starting the business pushed him into homelessness temporarily.

“There are more of us than you might know,” Landfield says of the working homeless. “I’m somebody who started a business with no money and immediately lost his home and could not afford rent.” He adds, “It was one grade of homelessness; it was real debilitating — there are people way beyond that.”

There are a few important distinctions in Landfield’s platform. First, he is the most outspoken candidate against putting a building on Kesey Square or any public space downtown.  

“I have some interesting ideas about how to save it and make it safe,” he says of the square.

Landfield also says he wants to dismantle the present form of government in Eugene — a weak City Council made up of elected officials who only serve (and are only paid) part-time, combined with a strong city manager, an unelected city official who essentially acts as king of the city.

He says he’s also staunchly against urban renewal and the MUPTE tax break, or at least until the process can slow down and the city isn’t pushing through “multi-million dollar” projects without transparency. 

For example, Landfield says he’s puzzled how the city could ask residents of south Eugene to pay half the cost of burying power lines while many members of City Council, along with City Manager Jon Ruiz and city staff, suggest that at least $4 million of urban renewal funds could go towards a publicly owned fiber optic network for high-speed internet that will only benefit downtown.

The candidate also says he wants to look into campaign finance reform, addressing homelessness, the “huge issue” of the EWEB property and the city’s role in developing it, the “fiasco” of the city’s process with the South Willamette Special Area Zone and term limits.

“We are getting these tired ideas,” he says. “We’re getting people entrenched, including the city manager.”

He points to the unchallenged seats in City Council — Claire Syrett, Chris Pryor, Betty Taylor — as a sign of the erosion of the public trust.

“It’s a broke system when no one is running,” he says. “They’ve given up.”

Landfield says his mayoral run is to show by example how easy it is to civically engage, as well as to ensure that issues like Kesey Square and Eugene’s form of government stay in the limelight through the election.

And if he wins?

“I’ll do the best I can,” he says. “I don’t claim to be a bureaucrat so there will be a big learning curve.”

Landfield adds with a smile: “I do claim to get an inordinate amount of attention.”

RELATED CONTENT: 

Progressive Values

Councilor Clark

Bob Cassidy Wants Your Vote

About the Author

 

Alex V. Cipolle

Arts Editor

Alexandra is the arts editor for Eugene Weekly. She formerly wrote under the name Alex Notman. You can follow her on twitter at @ArtsEditorAlex

 

...speaking of Malheur...

Scott Landfield

No one writes about the intersection of land policy, politics, and the human footprint better than Wallace Stegner. His classic collection of essays, Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs: Living and Writing in the West, is a poignant meditation that is both exquisitely written and indelibly realized.

A recently unearthed poem written in a bunkhouse in Burns, Oregon

Scott Landfield

The Sundowner Motel, Burns Oregon, 1996

11947821_10155991232240484_7948809778525279605_o.jpg

8 men, 1 bunkhouse;
average age 42.
5 beds—queensize…
3 men sleeping on the floor.

2 dogs, pitbull and a bitch
Katie, age 13, got 1 trick:
“Katie, what do the girls in Springfield do?
Katie!!!”
Katie rolls over, spreads her hind legs wide.
Each man shares a short laugh
the first time he sees the trick.
Katie loves the men laughing.

These men, they’re different:
not loggers, not construction,
not oil-rig workers;
not fishermen not firefighters,
not farm laborers not ranchers,
not cowboys not prison guards,
not fancy-pants do-nothings,
not like any other rangey gang
of men you’ve ever known.

Treeplanters they are,
9 long months a year,
year after year after year;
restful soldiers of fortune,
quiet, powerful, fragile-hearted and broke,
occupying some other middle of nowhere,
a couple million trees left growing in their wake.

Booker Rule